Who We Are

IMPAACT4TB – Increasing Market and Public health outcomes through scaling up Affordable Access models of short Course preventive therapy for TB.

IMPAACT4TB is a four-year project introducing a new way to tackle latent Tuberculosis (TB) infection—the seedbed of TB—in order to slow and ultimately stop the flood of new TB cases occurring every year. We’re doing this by identifying and providing new, shorter treatment options for people with latent TB infection.

The project will prioritize short-course TB preventive therapy for people living with HIV and children under five, and subsequently all those in close contact with TB patients in 12 high-burden countries—who represent 50 percent of the global TB burden.

By treating latent TB infection, we can prevent thousands of people from developing TB disease— and ultimately save lives.

Treatment for latent TB infection has been available since the 1960s, yet very few people who are eligible for TB preventive therapy are taking it. Current treatment options are long— with people required to take a pill daily for 6 to 36 months. Even among those who start treatment, many fail to complete the full course.

Project Countries

12 countries covered by the IMPAACT4TB members:

South Africa, Mozambique, Ghana

Malawi, Tanzania, Ethiopia,  and Indonesia

Cambodia, India, Kenya and Zimbabwe

Brazil

The 12 strategically-selected countries are all high burden settings with distinct delivery challenges and are representative of the various TB epidemics where latent TB infection plays a unique role in sustaining their epidemics. The countries were selected to represent different epidemiological settings and funding mechanisms. In each of these countries, one of the consortium members has an organizational presence with the capacity to carry out programme activities and existing relationships with the Ministry of Health and National Tuberculosis Programs (NTP).

Across these 12 countries, an estimated 40 million people living with HIV and 5.7 million children living in close contact with TB will be at risk of developing the disease between 2017 and 2019.